Info:

I've developed this (non-exhaustive) catalogue of templates. It's a work in progress, in that there's more I'd like to do with it, but it should be useful as it is. Please advise any errors, improvements or notable omissions.

It would be nice to have standard descriptive language for templates, which everyone could use; I have borrowed and extended Cameron Browne's terminology - but I am very willing to debate and amend if there is good reason. I have avoiding naming each individual template, pending any feedback.

Diagram key:

Cell is required in the template; if it is occupied by the opponent you do not have a certain connection

Cell is not required in the template, and may be occupied by the opponent

Cell is occupied by you

Cell is connected to the bottom edge of the board (but the connection is not shown)

Cell is connected to the top edge of the board (but the connection is not shown)

Dotted lines show where a ladder may start or end. The arrow shows the direction in which the ladder advances.

Where relevant, templates are shown on the bottom edge. They could of course be transposed to any edge, (or indeed to the middle of the board, if a suitable line of cells is occupied to substitute for the edge).

For brevity, mirror images are omitted.
 
 

Guaranteed Edge templates:

These will always connect, if played correctly; no defence can prevent this.

Second row:
 

Third row:


(thanks to Mike Amling and Eric Demer
- in effect a ladder escape)

 

Fourth row:


(thanks to Eric Demer)


(thanks to Eric Demer)


(from Mike Amling)


(from Mike Amling)

 

Fifth row:


(thanks to Eric Demer)


(thanks to Eric Demer)


(from Mike Amling)


(from Mike Amling)


(from Mike Amling)


(Mike Amling/DK)


(Mike Amling/DK)


(Mike Amling/DK)


(thanks to Eric Demer)

 

Sixth row


(from Mike Amling)

 

Cascading Edge templates:

These can be defended against, but the best outcome for the defence is merely a ladder. This ladder may connect later, or may lead to other advantage for the aggressor.

The dotted lines show how the ladder will extend. The highest row ladder that the defence can force is shown.

Second row:

Third row:

Fourth row:
 

Fifth row:

Guaranteed Ladder Escape templates:

These will complete a ladder with a successful connection.

For a long enough ladder approach, all 3rd row templates are also 2nd row templates, and all 4th row templates are also 3rd and 2nd row templates. This because the defence can force a ladder down a row, over a long enough run.

These will connect with cascading edge templates to make sure connections. Just add more cells in a ladder where the dotted lines appear. If the templates don't 'plug in' directly, add more empty cells where the dotted lines appear.

Where the edge template and the escape template are very close together, you may need fewer cells, or you may have a standalone template.
 

2nd row ladder escapes:

 

3rd row ladder escapes:
 

 (and others, cf second row ladder escapes)

 

4th row ladder escapes:

 (and others, cf second, third row ladder escapes)

 

Cascading Ladder Escape templates:

These will force a ladder to resume on a lower row. This lower row ladder may connect later, or may lead to other advantage for the aggressor.

The dotted lines show how the ladders approach and continue.
 


(thanks to Eric Demer)


foldback onto 2nd row


black can force 2nd row ladder in both directions
(thanks to Eric Demer)

Bridge templates:

These connect two cells.
 


page date: 20Aug07.      I enjoy correspondence stimulated by this site. You can contact me here.